Stranger Things, a Reading List Inspired by the Netflix Show

Have you binged watched all of Stranger Things and are wishing there was more for you to enjoy? Here’s a reading list to keep you busy until that feeling fades! Click on the link in the title to request the book from the library’s catalog.


Darkness on the edge of town by Adam Christopher. Chief Jim Hopper reveals long-awaited secrets to Eleven about his former life as a police detective in New York City, confronting his past before the events of the hit series, Stranger Things.

Stranger things: suspicious minds by Gwenda Bond. A prequel to the hit Netflix series explores several of the show’s mysteries and includes details about Eleven’s mother and her time as a test subject in the MKUltra program.

Stranger things : worlds turned upside down by Gina McIntyre. When the first season of Stranger Things debuted on Netflix in the summer of 2016, the show struck a nerve with millions of viewers worldwide and received broad critical acclaim. The series has gone on to win six Emmy Awards, but its success was driven more than anything by word of mouth, resonating across generations. Viewers feel personal connections to the characters. Now fans can immerse themselves in the world—or worlds—of Hawkins, Indiana, like never before.

Stranger things. Volume one, The other side by Jody Houser. “When Will Byers finds himself in the Upside Down, an impossible dark parody of his own world, he’s understandably frightened. But that’s nothing compared with the fear that takes hold when he realizes what’s in that world with him!”—Provided by publisher. (There are more entries in this graphic novel series.)

Runaway Max by Brenna Yovanoff. The never-before-told backstory of the beloved Dig Dug maven, Max Mayfield. Based on the hit Netflix series, Stranger Things, explores Max’s past—the good and the bad—as well as how she came to find her newfound sense of home in Hawkins, Indiana.

Only a monster by Vanessa Len. Joan has just learned the truth: her family are monsters, with terrifying, hidden powers. And the cute boy at work isn’t just a boy: he’s a legendary monster slayer, who will do anything to destroy her family. To save herself and her family, Joan will have to do what she fears most: embrace her own monstrousness. Because in this story she is not the hero.

Salem’s lot by Stephen King. Salem’s Lot is the story of a mundane town under siege from the forces of darkness. Considered one of the most terrifying vampire novels ever written, it cunningly probes the shadows of the human heart, and the insular evils of small-town America.

Meddling kids : a novel by Edgar Cantero. In the summer of 1977 Blyton Summer Detective Club solved their final mystery and unmasked the elusive Sleepy Lake monster. Now it’s 1990, and the time has come to get the team back together, face their fears, and find out what actually happened all those years ago at Sleepy Lake.

Strange grace by Tessa Gratton. “Every seven years, the people of Three Graces send a sacrifice to the woods. The death of their ‘best boy’ ensures seven years free from disease, blight, and pain. But this year, the Slaughter Moon has risen early, and three, not one, will run into the forest as a sacrifice”— Provided by publisher.

Something wicked this way comes by Ray Bradbury. A carnival rolls in sometime after the midnight hour on a chill Midwestern October eve, ushering in Halloween a week before its time. A calliope’s shrill siren song beckons to all with a seductive promise of dreams and youth regained. In this season of dying, Cooger and Dark’s Pandemonium Shadow Show has come to Green Town, Illinois, to destroy every life touched by its strange and sinister mystery. And two inquisitive boys standing precariously on the brink of adulthood will soon discover the secret of the satanic rare show’s smoke, mazes, and mirrors, as they learn all too well the heavy cost of wishes.


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