A Reader’s Advisory of the Most Popular Items from the O’Fallon Public Library Collection — January thru March 2022

Here are the most circulated items from adult fiction, adult non-fiction, and music so far this year from the O’Fallon Public Library’s collection! See what your neighbors are reading (and listening to) most and request your copy today from the library’s catalog by clicking on the title. Book descriptions are taken from the library catalog.

Adult Fiction

The Judge’s List by John Grisham. Lacy Stoltz is approaching forty, tired of her work for the Florida Board on Judicial Conduct, and ready for a change. Then she meets a mysterious woman who is so frightened she uses a number of aliases. Jeri Crosby’s father was murdered twenty years earlier in a case that remains unsolved and that has grown stone cold. But Jeri has a suspect whom she has become obsessed with and has stalked for two decades. Along the way, she has discovered other victims.

Apples Never Fall: a novel by Liane Moriarty. The Delaneys are fixtures in their community. The parents, Stan and Joy, are the envy of all of their friends. They’re killers on the tennis court, and off it their chemistry is palpable. But after fifty years of marriage, they’ve finally sold their famed tennis academy and are ready to start what should be the golden years of their lives. So why are Stan and Joy so miserable?

The Paris Detective by James Patterson. The evidence is clear — Luc Moncrief, the most famous detective in Paris, is now the sharpest crime-solving mind in the NYPD. Here are three thrilling cases from the creator of Alex Cross and Detective Michael Bennett.

The Dark Hours by Michael Connelly. There’s chaos in Hollywood at the end of the New Year’s Eve countdown. Working her graveyard shift, LAPD detective Reňee Ballard is called to a scene where a hardworking auto shop owner has been fatally hit by a bullet in the middle of a crowded street party. Ballard quickly concludes that the bullet is linked to another unsolved murder–a case at one time worked by Detective Harry Bosch.

Fear No Evil by James Patterson. Alex Cross enters the final battle with the all-knowing genius who has stalked him and his family for years. Dr. Alex Cross and Detective John Sampson venture into the rugged Montana wilderness–where they will be the prey. They’re not on the job, but on a personal mission. Until they’re attacked by two rival teams of assassins, controlled by the same mastermind who has stalked Alex and his family for years. Darkness falls.

The Wish by Nicholas Sparks. 1996 was the year that changed everything for Maggie Dawes. Sent away at sixteen to live with an aunt she barely knew in Ocracoke, a remote village on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, she could think only of the friends and family she left behind, until she met Bryce Trickett, one of the few teenagers on the island. Bryce showed her how much there was to love about the wind-swept beach town—and introduced her to photography, a passion that would define the rest of her life.

Game On: Tempting Twenty-eight by Janet Evanovich. When Stephanie Plum is woken up in the middle of the night by the sound of footsteps in her apartment, she wishes she didn’t keep her gun in the cookie jar in her kitchen. And when she finds out the intruder is fellow apprehension agent Diesel, six feet of hard muscle and bad attitude who she hasn’t seen in more than two years, she still thinks the gun might come in handy.

The Jailhouse Lawyer by James Patterson. A young lawyer takes on the judge who is destroying her hometown—and ends up in jail herself. In picture-perfect Erva, Alabama, the most serious crimes are misdemeanors. Speeding tickets. Shoplifting. Contempt of court. Then why is the jail so crowded? And why are so few prisoners released? There’s only one place to learn the truth behind these incriminating secrets.

The Last Thing He Told Me: a novel by Laura Dave. Before Owen Michaels disappears, he smuggles a note to his beloved wife of one year: Protect her. Hannah Hall knows the note refers to Owen’s sixteen-year-old daughter, Bailey, who lost her mother tragically as a child — and who wants absolutely nothing to do with her new stepmother. When the FBI arrests Owen’s boss and a US marshal and federal agents arrive at her Sausalito home unannounced, Hannah quickly realizes her husband isn’t who he said he was. And that Bailey just may hold the key to figuring out Owen’s true identity — and why he really disappeared.

Mercy by David Baldacci. For her entire life, FBI agent Atlee Pine has been searching for her twin sister, Mercy, who was abducted at the age of six and never seen again. Mercy’s disappearance left behind a damaged family that later shattered beyond repair when Atlee’s parents inexplicably abandoned her. Now, after a perilous investigation that nearly proved fatal, Atlee has finally discovered not only the reason behind her parents’ abandonment and Mercy’s kidnapping, but also the most promising breakthrough yet: proof that Mercy survived her abduction and then escaped her captors many years ago.

Adult Non-Fiction

Peril by Bob Woodward. Woodward and Costa take readers deep inside the Trump White House, the Biden White House, the 2020 campaign, and the Pentagon and Congress, with vivid, eyewitness accounts of what really happened.

Educated: a memoir by Tara Westover. Traces the author’s experiences as a child born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, describing her participation in her family’s paranoid stockpiling activities and her resolve to educate herself well enough to earn acceptance into a prestigious university and the unfamiliar world beyond.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing by Marie Kondō. Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you’ll never have to do it again. The KonMari Method, with its revolutionary category-by-category system, leads to lasting results.

The Dawn of Everything: a new history of humanity by David Graeber. An account of human history, challenging our most fundamental assumptions about social evolution-from the development of agriculture and cities to the emergence of “the state,” political violence, and social inequality-and revealing new possibilities for human emancipation.

Deep Work: rules for focused success in a distracted world by Cal Newport. Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It’s a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep — spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there’s a better way.

Gastro Obscura: a food adventurer’s guide by Cecily Wong. Covering all seven continents, explores incredible ingredients, food adventures, and edible wonders.

Untamed by Glennon Doyle. Part intimate memoir and part galvanizing wake-up call, the author shows women how they can begin to trust themselves enough to set boundaries, make peace with their bodies, honor their anger and heartbreak, and unleash their truest, wildest instincts so that they become women who can finally look at themselves and say: There She Is.

I am Malala: the girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai. When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday October 9, 2012, she almost paid the ultimate price.

The Last Slave Ship: the true story of how Clotilda was found, her descendants, and an extraordinary reckoning by Ben Raines. This story of the last ship to carry enslaved people to America recounts its perilous journey, its rediscovery and its complex legacy–and how America continues to struggle with the traumatic past of slavery and the ways in which racial oppression continue to this day.

Thick: and other essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom. An exploration of race, beauty, money, and more. Tressie McMillan Cottom explains the problem with society and reveals how the political, the social, and the personal are almost always the same.

Photo by Burst on Pexels.com

Music

Fearless by Taylor Swift.

The Future by Nathaniel Rateliff.

Mercury, Act 1 by Imagine Dragons.

Red by Taylor Swift.

All I know so far: setlist by P!nk

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